Kakuma News Reflector – A Refugee Free Press

Resilience in Laughter

Posted in Arts, Community and Culture, Education, Humanitarian Services, News Updates by KANERE on December 31, 2016

By Tolasa Shome and Qaabata Boru

Clowns Without Borders bring joy to Kakuma children (more…)

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I Hate My Tribe

Posted in Arts, Opinion by KANERE on December 31, 2016

By Addisu

A tribe is a group of people, often who live together sharing the same language, culture and history, especially those who do not live in towns or cities. (Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary, 3rd edn.)

According to me, in relation to modernization and social integration of global society, tribal sentiment is a backward idea that can vanish in the process of civilization.

Look at the above definition of tribe which says “Tribe is … those who do not live in towns or cities.” For those who live in rural villages in their tribe, their tribe matters a lot than – their nationhood – because their tribe is their world. It would be an amazing question to a ‘White Man’ (a European or North American) if you ask them what is their tribe. This is not because they never had a tribe but they passed the tribal stage of human evolution and abandoned their tribe long, long ago through civilization and urbanization to the extent that this question surprises them. Today, they (western civilized societies) do not have a tribe but a race of civilized people, and that is where the global society is heading to.

Civilization coupled with digital technology has speeded up the global social integration of peoples of different cultures. We are a global community who share languages, cultures, values, etc.

If we look at the origin of conflicts especially in Africa, they often have an ethnic dimension and are deeply rooted in tribal divisions. The decades-long conflict in South Sudan is one good example.

Tribalism is a precursor of racism; and a tribalist is a racist in a broader view. If we are tribalist, why should we blame others for being racist?

If we use our tribe to discriminate against, marginalize, and/or to promote hatred against others who are not our tribesmen, then do not ask me my tribe. I HATE MY TRIBE.

A Term “Refugee”

Posted in Arts, Contributors, Education by KANERE on February 13, 2016

By Addisu Aznato – Kakuma

One day I asked my students in Intermediate English Language class if they had known the English word “beauty”, but they said they hadn’t. (more…)

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The Stove of Scandals

Posted in Arts, Uncategorized by KANERE on December 25, 2014

A Poem By A. Kuot
(more…)

Open Letter to the UNHCR Office

Posted in Arts, Opinion by KANERE on August 16, 2014

Friday, April 18, 2014

To the Office of UN – High Commissioner for Refugees, Switzerland, Geneva.

Subject: Arbitrary arrest and deportation of refugees in Nairobi (more…)

Peace in South Sudan

Posted in Arts, News Updates by KANERE on March 12, 2014

By QB

I run away because (more…)

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A Poem for UNHCR

Posted in Arts by KANERE on August 28, 2013

By Ayellow

We are like microorganisms

in a dry riverbed. The Earth, the wind

and our native countries unite to persecute us.

Our countries dispose of us, the earth broils us

and the wind blows us away, de-graded

and traumatized. We have no allies. We only

have U, beloved UNHCR. Life is wind erosion,

Life is dispersing us like dust.

Lucky citizens of the world, if you have

time to breathe today, or go to the beach,

I beg you to look out for us. We are always there

blowing in the wind or sinking in boats

from across your golden beaches.

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Ten Reasons for the Arts in Refugee Camps

Posted in Arts, Community and Culture, News Updates by KANERE on December 27, 2012

By Awet Andemicael
awet@post.harvard.edu

Last year, I conducted research for UNHCR (available online at http://www.unhcr.org/4def858a9.html), which suggests that artistic activity often plays a powerful positive role in the lives of refugees living in camps, and can help them survive and even thrive emotionally, spiritually, and physically. (more…)

Requirements to be a Refugee

Posted in Arts by KANERE on December 27, 2012

By Rwanda Gasabo

One day, a rich father took his son on a trip. He wanted to show him how refugees can be. They spent time in the camp of these poor refugee families. On their way home, he asked his son, “Did you see how they are? What have you learnt, son?” The son said, “We have got a pool, they have got a seasonal river with a fantastic name, “LAGGA”. We have lanterns which come on at night but most of them have stars. Daddy one thing is very funny, we buy food, but they queue while some are beaten to receive theirs for free every two weeks. We have walls to protect us; they have friends around their thatched houses. Look! We have encyclopedias, they have The Bible.” And he added, “Thanks Dad for showing me how poor we might be…”

“It does not take much to be a refugee, simply your belief, education, political opinion, or residence in a mineral rich area.”

It’s not about what you have or don’t have, it’s about who you are. Who takes care of refugees? God, which is where their identity is.

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UNHCR’s Home

Posted in Arts by KANERE on April 16, 2012

Thatch, tarpaulin,
Poles, ropes and nails,
UNHCR’s definition of a home.
No materials for a door,
Leave alone a latrine.

By Maketh Ajak

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No Ration for Birds

Posted in Arts by KANERE on April 16, 2012

Girl pounding grains in a mortar
Droves off doves pecking at the bran
With a pestle.
There’s no ration,
For birds from World Food Program.

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Art on the Run

Posted in Arts, News Updates by KANERE on August 21, 2011

By Torben Ulrik Nissen, Jesper Lorentz Bertelsen and a KANERE reporter. 

Art on the Run is a project supported by the Danish Centre for Culture and Development. Danish artists arrived in Kakuma on March 21st and left on April 6th, 2011. During their stay, the Art on the Run team shared their experiences with a welcoming and enthusiastic refugee community. The artists met with KANERE journalists, artists, refugees and humanitarian Agencies (more…)